Monthly Archives: April 2019

Drip, Drip, Drip…

By Eric Wenning

I hoping I have your attention now, considering that my title sounds like the chorus of a Trap Song!

Do you have a proper Email Drip Delay Sequence setup for your follow ups? Did you just scratch your head, asking “What is an Email Drip Delay Sequence?”

I thought you’d never ask!

An Email Drip Delay Sequence is an automated series of emails sent out over a series of specific days to help gradually build rapport with your leads. For example, after speaking with a lead, you would enter their info into an email sequence that will automatically follow up with them on the days you select, for example on days 3, 5, 7, etc.

You get the idea.

This is crucial nowadays with Millennials loving to email and text, and allows you to build trust by providing a steady drip of information to guide them towards choosing your company — without doing any work, other than your initial setup of the sequence!

As I teach my students all the time: You have to be creative with your copy to gain their attention. Even more importantly is the subject line! Most DJs have no clue how to use something as simple as a compelling subject line to get a better open rate.

Here are a few examples to help you: 

  • Adding Custom Symbols, First Names and Hashtags
  • Adding Emojis to your Subject Line
  • Adding ‘Blank Space’ before your Subject Line provides an indent
  • [Adding Brackets]
  • Ask a Question?

Just think how many junk emails you get in one day. More than you can count right? You need to make your emails stand out from everything else. Get creative; give crazy weird stats to pique curiosity; engage with them to build report.

“Did you know 67% of Brides forget Deodorant on their Wedding Day?” See, now I have you curious wondering if that many Brides actually are “un-Sure.”

If you want to increase your closing ratio, set up an email drip delay and execute better subject lines to get your prospects to open your emails and engage with you more.

P.S. 89% of people that read a 400-word article only retain 150 words!

In addition to his highly successful multi-op business in Pittsburgh, PA, Eric has degrees in Graphic Design and Marketing and also owns a full ad agency that specializes in Social Media Advertising for many different types of companies. For more info or to contact Eric visit www.wenningmethod.com

Never Let Them See You Sweat

By Mike Walter

There was a very popular ad campaign for Dry Idea when I was a kid.  If you’re my age or older you probably remember it.  It featured a number of people from various professions talking about the “nevers” in their career and they always ended with: “never let ‘em see you sweat.”  One, for example, was a stand-up comic who said the nevers in comedy were, “never follow a better comedian, never give a heckler the last word and, no matter how bad a joke bombs, never let ‘em see you sweat.” I grew up with that as a mantra and it’s stuck with me to this day.

I thought about that message twice in the same day recently.  Alex Trebek, he of Jeopardy fame, made a video to get the word out that he had been diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer.  Trebek, who any public speaker has to admire for his polish, professionalism, and incredible pronunciation skills, produced a video that is equal parts uplifting and humorous.  He declares that he believes he will beat cancer, finishing with the idea that he has to, because he still has three years left on his contract.  It reminded me of the old Henny Youngman line about his doctor giving him six months to live but when he couldn’t pay his medical bill he gave him six more months (ba dum bum).  Trebek, no doubt, is reeling inside from the news.  At 78, he should have many years in front of him, but who knows now.  Pancreatic cancer is a tough one.  But instead of looking scared or forlorn, the video shows him focused and determined. He is the quintessential professional, as he’s been his entire career, and no matter what deodorant he uses (do they even make Dry Idea anymore?) he has channeled that decades-old ad campaign.

The same day Trebek made his announcement, R Kelly was interviewed on CBS by Gayle King.    The interview didn’t reveal anything new (Kelly vehemently denies the allegations that are so thoroughly laid out in the documentary Surviving R Kelly) but the interview made news for King’s grace under pressure.  Indeed, there is one image (that became an instant meme) of Kelly standing up and screaming while King sits in her chair calmly, not even looking at him.  If you look up “grace under pressure,” you should see that picture.

How does one maintain such poise? How does someone faced with the worse possible diagnosis make a video that is so uplifting?

Surely, experience is a factor. It’s doubtful that Trebek or King could have been so controlled in their first few years of broadcasting. Preparation has something to do with it as well.  We don’t know how long Trebek prepared for his video.  He might have taken days to get all the sobbing out before he hit record. And, no doubt, King knew that Kelly may explode when confronted with the disgusting allegations from the documentary, so she was ready for it.

However they did it, as a fellow public speaker, I admired both moments.  Things happen at my events that pale in comparison to what Trebek and King were dealing with, yet I often get flustered.  I often react one way and then moments later think of a better way to handle things.  How can I channel both of these professionals the next time I’m faced with something like a wedding cake toppling over or two bridesmaids getting into a fight on the dance floor?  I want to be as polished and smooth and I believe that awareness is a big factor.  Knowing how high the bar is set helps one jump higher.

I was in my teens when I first heard the catch phrase: “Never let ‘em see you sweat.”  It comes up often in any performance job because things happen spontaneously.  We can only hope to handle them as well as Alex Trebek and Gayle King did on that same day in early March of 2019.  We should set our sights at being as unflappable as they both appeared, hopefully we can get close to it.  That’s my goal anyway.

Do DJs Own Their Mixes?

By Tony Fernandez

It’s a Tuesday, you and a group of DJ colleagues are over the house in the man cave or she-shed doing what DJs do: talking shop, talking music and getting on the set,  goofing off and working out mixes. Let’s say you do some dazzling, death defying mix that makes every DJ in the room go “OOOOH”!!!  Dope selection. Dope segue.  Executed to perfection. It was a good night.

Fast forward to two weeks later, your gig is done, it’s early, you stop off to go check out one of your buddies who’s spinning not too far away and… you hear the SAME mix you did.

The way I see it, there are two ways you can react to this…

1) Wow! That’s cool!  Mix sounds great on a large system and people are digging the vibe on the dance floor.  Glad to see it works in action!

Or…

2) That lousy mother trucker stole my idea! What a Cotton-Headed Ninny Muggins!!!

I can barely put into words how low, vile, despicable, lazy and downright uncouth it is to take other people’s work and pass it off as your own.  It’s stealing, no question.  Just because there is nothing tangible being taken, doesn’t mean it isn’t stealing. The disgust factor in DJ world is exponentially higher because not only are you taking something that you didn’t create; you’re passing it off as if you created it.  What a philistine.

Now while I wholeheartedly agree that it is verboten to take another DJ’s “work” and pass it off as your own, do DJs “own” or have the right to claim dominion over a mix/segue? To be succinct: No. DJs do not have ownership over a blend they create. No matter how original. It is of my opinion that the concept of “I own that mix” / “that’s my mix” borders on lunacy.

To put a finer point on it, I am referring to mixes, as in mixing from one song into another.  Routines that DJs and turntablists create for shows and competitions are completely different.  I do believe those routines are intrinsically attached to the DJ performing them. Jazzy Jeff, AM, A-Track, Q-bert, etc. — these DJs have an associated  sound and style.  They have taken certain records and incorporated them in such a manor that those mixes have been linked to them.  I get that. I’m on board with that.  BUT DJs saying “That’s my mix”… not so much.

Do you really think you’re the ONLY DJ on the face of the planet to figure out Song A goes with Song B REALLY well?  While someone has to be the first to figure it out, do you think that someone is you? Let’s say it is you, you’re the first. Now what?  You can’t copyright it, nor can you trademark it.  So what exactly is “yours?”  It’s a mix.

I’m not trying to kill any creative vibe.  Nor am I trying to give a pass to those DJs who’s idea of being creative is looking up some DJ’s set from SoundCloud and copying it verbatim. To those DJs who can’t come up with original concepts, I’ve got three words for you: practice, practice, practice. To those DJs who are pushing the envelope and coming up with innovative ways to present music to the masses, please continue doing what you do. You’re an inspiration.

To those DJs who fall under the category of ‘even a blind squirrel finds a nut’ take a step back, calm down and look at the big picture. Be fluid.  Be open-minded.  That dope mix you tripped across is going to be viable for maybe 4-6 weeks.  If you’re doing your job right, you are CONSTANTLY looking for dope tracks that work every week.  So don’t get hung up on one mix or ‘this is my idea.’  What works this week for this event is not guaranteed to work for the next one.

Come down off the pedestal. Besides, if other DJs are “taking” ideas from you, you’re doing something right!

Keep ‘em spinning.

Based out of Richmond, VA, DJ Tony Fernandez has been a DJ, Remixer, Producer, Musical Soothsayer and Audio Gear Oracle since 1980. Find him on Facebook. Email djtonytf@gmail.com