Tag Archives: DJ Business

The Triangle: Conferences, Workshops, & Coaching/Mentoring

By Brian Buonassisi:

As we embark on a new year, I think it’s important to assess where you are at and where you want to go in 2018. I’m not talking about fickle New Year’s Resolutions but more to steering your business in the right direction. For some, no major course correction is needed. For others, you many need to completely change directions due to where the wind in your market is taking you. Over the years, I’ve found that there’s a pattern to growth and it’s not a linear thing. It’s like a triangle – you keep going through it. You’re either in need of conferences, workshops or coaching/mentoring. All of them have their place but I thought as you start thinking through your 2018 budget, this is a perfectly timed topic to talk through each one.

Conferences
There’s really 3 “national” DJ conferences out there: Mobile Beat, Marquee, and the DJ Expo. While you can definitely pick up some things to help your business at any of them, these conferences are mainly inspiration and network heavy. To encourage attendance, the show producers have to cast a wide net and cover as broad material as possible. You have the beginners all the way through to the industry veterans. It’s a great way to re-charge with your DJ brothers and sisters as well as take in a ton of information over a couple days. However, the reality is that it could take weeks if not months to go through all your notes and implement a strategy to employ some of it.

Workshops
Typically, workshops are more narrowed in scope. You are drilling down on a specific subject matter (or two) rather than a large range of categories. For example, you may want to improve with mic etiquette or scratching or sales, etc. If there’s an area that you feel you could use some development in, finding a workshop to address that area could be the solution. The other advantage to workshops is that you interact with those who are looking to learn the same type of subject matter. That can bond you together with a person you may never have had a chance to meet otherwise.

Coaching/Mentoring
So far it may appear like each one of these options is a step up from the other. While coaching/mentoring could feel that way, I honestly think it could be a great first step. Rather than undoing bad habits or mistakes, you are able to deal with issues in real time. Finding a coach or a mentor isn’t cheap (not for the good ones at least) but it saves you a lot of money in in the long run. These sessions are either in one on one settings or in a small group (10-20 people) whereas a conference may have thousands and a workshop could have up to a hundred or so. The constant touches (at minimum you’re meeting a few times a year but most meet weekly or monthly) and accountability with coaching/mentoring makes a ton of difference in not only getting started with a plan but staying the course.

For myself, I’m in the coaching/mentoring category this year. Not only am I being coached in 2018 but I’m also coaching others. I’m only a few days in and it’s already been rewarding. What are your needs? What category do you fall in? It could be you need a little of all three. The reality is that doing any of these three things is going to put you ahead of 90% of your competition and give you a leg up. I hope to see you in one of these settings in 2018 and if I can help you at all, don’t hesitate to reach out.

Based out of NYC, DJ Brian Buonassissi is a successful internationally traveling DJ/MC specializing in luxury destination private events. He runs a multi-city mobile DJ/event business with offices in Southern California, Destin, FL and New York City. You can connect with him at brian@djbrianbofficial.com.

The True Cost of Music Piracy

By Glen Ervin:

As convenient as the interwebz has made getting the music you need, the low-cost and invisibility of the ‘net has led to an explosion of too good to be true offers from websites masquerading as legitimate record pools. Think of them as the modern day version of that guy in the alley selling “real” Rolexes out of the trunk of his El Dorado… with access to your hard drive.

Fortunately there are a few of ways to tell which sites are operating in the shadows; the easiest is to keep an eye out for those selling legacy releases. The labels don’t allow it (why give away your best sellers?). Hence, any site offering unlimited access to a legacy catalog is not partnered with the labels or paying the artists or labels who provide their music.

Why should you care? 

The Institute of Policy Innovation estimates that global music piracy causes $12.5 billion of economic losses every year. That breaks down domestically to 71,060 music industry jobs lost since the days of Napster — a loss of $2.7 billion in workers’ earnings that accounts for $291 million in personal income tax and $131 million in lost corporate income and production taxes.

That’s $422 million dollars that could be going towards schools, roads, libraries and more – gone.

Let’s put that in terms every mobile operator can understand…

Economic losses on a scale that’s followed by nine zeros impacts everything from how much you charge for a wedding to how much time you get to spend with your family (instead of wearing all the hats required to run your business) to the car you drive — not a problem, by the way, for the $19.99 all you can download guys who keep all your money and drive Range Rovers.

Which brings us back to our friend in the alley and his deals on wheels…

If it seems to good to be true… it is.

Give your money to some hustler looking to turn downloads into dollars at the artist’s expense and you’ll just be feeding the dog-eat-dog world that keeps us all working for less than we deserve.

It’s up to you to decide what’s need and what’s greed.

After being turned out to pasture following a 16-year club residency, Glen Ervin finds himself gainfully employed as Promo Only sales manager, media consultant and staff writer.

Book More Events By Spreading Out Your Reviews

By Brian Buonassissi:

A wise businessman once told me, “To book more business, be everywhere.” These days it’s never been easier or more affordable to be everywhere — that’s why reviews are so great! They don’t cost you anything and with a ton of third-party review sites out there, your chances of clients finding you go way up the more places those reviews can be seen.

Just like social media, some will gravitate to certain platform over others. Very few (that I’ve seen anyway) use multiple review sites. I also think asking clients to leave reviews on multiple review sites comes across as a chore (even if it is just a copy and paste) and does nothing to motivate them to jump on a computer and start cranking out a review.

One of the biggest changes we’ve made in our business to increase the number of places where we can be found is to ask clients what reviews sites they use on our client intake form. We’ve struck the verb “review” from our company vernacular (it’s such an ugly word) so the way we phrase these questions (we feel) helps us get those answers.

Here’s the verbiage we use…
*Have you set up a Knot Profile?
*Have you set up a WeddingWire Profile?
*Are you a frequent Yelper?
*Do you use Google Reviews?
*Do you use Facebook Reviews?

If there are other sites you use which have an option for reviews (i.e. GigMasters, Thumbtack, etc.), you might want to add those to the list above. By asking these questions on a client intake form, it is much more disarming. That said, if they don’t fill this out before our “creative planning meeting”, we’ll do it in person when we meet. It gives us a good idea of not only the effectiveness of this strategy but also gives us direction on where to send them when it’s time to send them a request to “share their experience”.

This is important for Yelp especially. With that particular site, if they aren’t a frequent Yelper, it doesn’t do any good to send them there because their review will be posted under the “unverified” category and those reviews are not easy to find. Yelp (as do all these sites) want it to feel organic and not as if the company asked for it. If they are a frequent Yelper, send them there. Those reviews won’t get flagged and you should be fine.

Now, going this route may cut down how many reviews you get on a specific site and could put your “best of” awards from those sites in jeopardy by not meeting a certain threshold. If they utilize more than two of these sites mentioned above, we’ll rotate out our review requests every three or so months with which one we push clients to use, assuming they are using multiple platforms.

By doing it this way, it still allows us to hit that magical number to qualify for the awards.

If you have never tried this approach, I encourage you to give it a test run. See if your inquiry sources start to multiply. If your sales pitch is solid, this should hopefully lead to more bookings.

Let me know how it works for you.

Based out of NYC, DJ Brian Buonassissi is a successful internationally traveling DJ/MC specializing in luxury destination private events. He runs a multi-city mobile DJ/event business with offices in Southern California, Destin, FL and New York City. You can connect with him at brianbuonassissi@discjockeynews.com.

Communication is Key: Creating Connections w/ Mitch TayloR

By Mitch Taylor:

I don’t know about you but at the age of 42 I find it increasingly difficult to communicate with today’s millennial brides, the majority of who tend to prefer to communicate via email. My assistant (a 24-year-old millennial herself) and I had occasion to discuss this the other day after a bridal show and were amazed that some businesses still use very formal language to communicate with young brides — only to be left wondering why they get no response.

Speak to a prospective bride just as she is speaking to you.  If she’s using short sentences with basic language, do the same. If she mentions descriptive words about her event use those same words in your reply.

Here’s an example of an email recently received and how we handled it to get the appointment:

Hello I am just getting ideas and prices at the moment and I was wondering around what your average pricing would be I would also like the uplighting also an email would prob be the best way to respond thanks for your time.

Amber

My response:

Hi!  How’s your wedding planning going?  I got your email regarding entertainment and uplighting for your wedding.  I attached a photo above to show you examples of our work and how we can transform your venue too.  Feel free to call me anytime and let’s talk about your day.  906.786.6967.  Thanks for contacting me and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

 Mitch

Bride’s Reply:

I am sorry I have gotten your calls but been busy working.  At this time we are going to go with a live band from 8-12.  I am looking to rent uplighting (for the whole night of the reception) and also entertainment from 4:00pm-8pm.  Not many have been willing to do that time slot since it is Labor Day weekend.  Please let me know

My response:

Hi Amber,

Sure…we can do that.  When’s a good time for us to get together to chat about your wedding?

Bride’s Reply:

I work in Marquette at Lowe’s.  My next days off are Monday and Tuesday.  I have a cake appointment in Marquette on Monday at 12pm.  Where are you located and what is a good time for you?

My reply:

Hi Amber,

What about Monday at 1:30pm?  Would that work?

Bride’s Reply:

Yes I think that would work.  What is the best phone number to get a hold of you in case I need too?  I have a cake appointment a 12:00 so I will be in town.

 My next response was to send her an email confirming that date and time with an appointment reminder from DJ Event Planner.

Bottom line: Brides want to do business with someone who understands what they want, gives them the information they need in a timely fashion connects with them.

Be real. Be honest. But most importantly be relatable. Speak to them the same way through email as you would over the phone.

About: Mitch Taylor owns and operates Taylored Weddings and can be reached via email at mitch@mitchtaylor.net. For more info about his Creating Connections books and workshops visit creatingconnections.biz

 

I Like To Move It Move It!

By Mike Walter:

My wife Kelly and I were in Seattle a few years ago and we decided to hike Mt Rainier. On the bus ride out we started chatting with a woman named Hannah who was traveling by herself. She told us she was an epidemiologist (which I found out means she’s a doctor who studies diseases).   Half-jokingly, I asked her what disease was going to kill all of mankind and without missing a beat she said, “Inactivity.”

I have to say I was relieved to hear that because I consider myself a pretty active person but I also have to admit that there have been times since then where I wanted to skip a run or workout or even a walk with my dogs but Hannah’s succinct, one word, spontaneous answer has echoed in my head and got me moving.

When you think about it, almost every major invention of mankind’s has made us more sedentary. We invented the wheel and we domesticated wild animals to help us move things. We created engines to move us even faster. We’ve made everything from Egg Beaters to escalators all in an effort to make our lives easier. But in doing so we’ve triggered a gene inside most of us that loves to relax. And, believe me, there’s nothing wrong with relaxing, but only after you’ve earned it through some hard work and motion.

We as a society, and definitely we as an industry, need to move more. We need to do more. We need to avoid the disease of “Inactivity” and all myriad health issues that come along with it.

Many people know I like to run. It’s my favorite healthy activity. I’ve done sixteen marathons in my life and while I’m not quite in marathon condition anymore, I still love to lace up my sneakers and head out, whether it’s for a short, fast run or a leisurely long jog. Knowing this, many people have asked me how they should get started if they too want to run. Here’s my simple advice: get off the couch. Don’t set too lofty of a goal early on because it’s impossible (and dangerous) to go from couch potato to marathon runner in a few weeks. If you’re currently overweight and inactive my advice would be to seek your doctor’s approval first and foremost and assuming you’re given the green light, go for a walk. Day one, make it a ten minute stroll. Day two, add a minute or two. If you have a track near your home, it’s an ideal place to head. Tracks are softer on your joints and if you get too tired, you’re never too far from your car.

And when you’re ready to speed it up a bit, fear not! Because, here’s the thing about running: you already know how to do it. It’s in your DNA. Remember, before mankind invented all those things to make us sedentary, we moved. We hunted and chased our food down, often after miles and miles on our feet. Or we were the hunted, and those who survived were fast enough to avoid the mountain lion or mastodon that wanted to make us dinner. So once you go from walking to jogging, don’t over think it. Just go a little faster and a little longer each and every day and soon you’ll be logging miles, shedding pounds and most importantly, avoiding all the detrimental side effects of inactivity.

Here’s one of the misperceptions of our industry: events don’t burn that many calories. Sure it’s better to be up and moving on a weekend night than sitting around in a the Lazy Boy flipping channels, but I think too many DJs do an event and think they’ve burned so many calories they are entitled to eat all night and then hit the drive-through on the way home. You’re wrong. Even if you’re a dancer, even if you move around a lot at your events, it’s very doubtful that you’re getting your heart rate up to an aerobic state and burning some real calories. So be careful equating one of your gigs to an increased amount of food and thinking you’ll be even.

My wife and I do a lot of little things to keep ourselves active. Kelly wears a Fitbit and she always strives to hit her 10,000 daily steps. When we go shopping, we usually park as far from the store as possible. We walk our dogs a lot. When we go to the beach, we often take a stroll along the shoreline. These are just a few of the many things you too can probably do just to be a little more active. The pay off in the end is well worth it and when the “sacrifice” is stepping away from the boob tube for a little while and getting some fresh air, it’s even better.
Mike Walter is the proud owner of Elite Entertainment, a Multi-System DJ Company in New Jersey that was recently selected by TheKnot.com and WeddingWire.com as a top Entertainment company in the country.

Is your first impression the RIGHT impression?

By Mitch Taylor:

Recently I was about to order breakfast at a hotel restaurant and was shocked to see that a three-egg omelet was $20.00. While at first I was thinking of turning around and going across the street to McDonald’s, I decided to continue.

Why? Everything about this restaurant spoke FIRST CLASS: The surroundings were impeccable. The waiter was extremely polite and cordial, asking us how quick we had to make it to our next event in the morning. The menu had souffléés and other high-end options with top ingredients listed in their offerings. I thought to myself “Let’s see what a $20 omelet tastes like.”

Our food came and it was absolutely phenomenal. The eggs were fluffy, the vegetables were not too over or undercooked. The meat was perfectly seasoned and tender. The cheese was melted just enough to pull in all of the flavors of the omelet together.

What does this experience have to do with you? Everything. What’s your presentation? Look at all of your service offerings and see if they are congruent. Does your website match the level of service you offer? Think like a bride or better yet, create a focus group from your past brides. How? Ask them. Most brides would LOVE to put themselves back into wedding planning mode even if it’s just for a few hours.

Once you have your focus group, ask them to rate upcoming marketing materials you plan to put out to put all of your services in order of preference with regards to quality and appearance. See what resonates with them and what doesn’t. Take care of the brides you surveyed afterwards by giving them each a gift card to their favorite restaurant. Trust me, it may seem a bit much to money to spend on research but in the long run it will be worth that and more because you will have your target customers (past brides) review your materials and give you valuable insight as to what they liked and what they didn’t.

Next: Do your marketing materials (business card, website, brochure, bridal show display) equal where you are at in your marketplace? If not you may be sending the wrong message. For example, if you are the highest priced entertainer in your market but your bridal show booth involves you standing behind it or worse yet just having brides fill out a slip without any engagement, then you are not sending the right message and brides will get confused as to why you are priced at the top of the market. As a recent bride told me at a bridal show when watching a DJ perform there “I don’t know why they bring third rate equipment to sell to first rate brides.”

Everything you do and offer makes an impression. Someone is always watching you when you are servicing the public. Always make sure to put your best foot forward and ensure your marketing stays congruent with the level of service you are providing.

Mitch Taylor has worked in the Mobile Disc Jockey industry for over two decades, first cutting his teeth as an on-board club DJ for Carnival Cruise Lines. In addition to owning and operating Taylored Weddings in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, he is a sought-after speaker and Gitomer Certified Advisor whose sales training, books, coaching and workshops are in high demand all over the country. 

Tips To Being A Traveling Destination Event DJ

By Brian Buonassissi

People ask me all the time, “How do you get into the destination event DJ business?” usually followed by “How do you make money doing so?”. Both are great questions and I’ll do my best to unpack some tips I’ve learned along the way (some of which weren’t available to me when I started).

Tip #1: NETWORK STRATEGICALLY

It doesn’t matter what business you are in, networking is essential. But when it comes to destination work, you find that 99.9% of destination clients have destination event planners. How do you find the planners that fit your ideal clientele? Utilize social media! For events, the best platform is Instagram. Search hashtags of areas you want to target such as #hawaiiwedding or a more generic term like #destinationevent. Then without being a stalker, follow and comment on vendor posts that make sense. I’ve booked more business on Instagram this year than in any year prior (I predict it will outpace my website bookings soon). Once the event happens, utilize Instagram again to showcase your work there (with appropriate hashtags) and tag the vendors. Then blog about it (great for SEO).

Tip #2: CONTROL COSTS

With music going digital, this has made travel events much easier. Most people don’t know this but Guitar Center rents gear and it’s affordable! I rented 2 speakers/stands, a lapel mic and cables for about $100. That’s an insane deal! I have a few different hardware controller options (different sizes/etc.) that I carry-on with me on a plane. Flights, transportation, and accommodations are typically the biggest cost you have – utilize travel websites and apps (message me for specific ones). When I wanted to expand to NYC, I would do an event and not even book a hotel room; just hang out in the City after the event and take the redeye or first early flight the next morning to save costs. Uber and AIRBNB give you many affordable options.

Tip #3: QUOTE WITH ACCURACY AND FLEXIBLITY

I quote in 2 ways – the first is a buyout for travel (does not include performance fee). Depending on where you go, this can range anywhere from $500-5000 and I include all my travel costs and gear. The 2nd way is to line-item it. With that 2nd option, I give them the option to book transportation/hotel or include as a line item. Most of the time, they have a block on rooms with a minimum and it helps the client to have you on that block. They also may have a transportation option for their guests/vendors to get to hotel/venue. The key is to give your client options. Some love the buyout; others are numbers people and like exact breakdowns. The more flexible you can be, the more jobs you’ll book.

Tip #4: USE TRAVEL AIDS

When you’re just starting out, as mentioned above, you want to keep costs low. However, there is value for you to using the same services. For instance, Delta is my airline. I use them for just about everything and I acquire points/mileage. Avis is my preferred car rental and so on. As you book more destination events, this tip becomes more useful.

Tip #5: DELIVER THE WOW PERFORMANCE

I put it last but without this, none of the other stuff maters; you’ll be a “one and done” destination event DJ. One thing I always do is to infuse the performance musically with some of the cultural feel of the location. If I’m in LA, I’m playing some West Coast Hip Hop; in NOLA, I’m adding some Zydeco; in Chi-town I’m dropping some house and “Homecoming”. In Jamaica, you know I’m mixing some Bob Marley. Research the area and know what works there AND with your crowd.

 

Based out of NYC, DJ Brian B is a successful internationally traveling private event DJ/MC. He runs a multi-city mobile DJ/event business with offices in Orange County, Calif, Destin, FL and New York City. You can check him out at djbrianbofficial.com or bboyproductions.com

5 Must-Have Apps That Have Made Me More Money

By Brian Buonassissi:

As a small business owner, I’m all about finding the best way to maximize my time and my revenue. Thanks to ever-evolving technology, I’ve come across a few things that have allowed me to both gain some “time back,” without having to hire someone, and make more money along the way.

In no particular order:

TINY CALENDAR

This is an app that syncs with Google Calendar. Google’s calendar app is not user-friendly so I prefer this app instead. I have all of our employees on it and we share our calendars with one another so when we need to schedule meetings, etc., we can manage it all very easily without having to e‐mail, call or text repeatedly. It also keeps me personally organized. With everything being stored online, I never have to worry about losing a paper calendar, journal, etc. I use the free version and it suits my needs perfectly. They have a pro version that you can get if you need it.

WUNDERLIST

This free app is amazing! It’s a to-do list. You can have as many to-do’s as you want and since I have 30 or so employees, I can easily assign tasks, etc. You can also use this online from a computer rather than your phone, if need be. I have multiple lists going and it is a perfect complement to Tiny Calendar.

SLACK

I wanted to find a communication tool that allowed my team and I to communicate easily without having to do so through e‐mail on everything. Enter Slack. I use the free version and it was a game changer for my business. The standalone app is fantastic but also has a desktop app for those who stare at a computer screen all day. If you are a multi‐op, this is a MUST for you and my #1 recommendation.

HOOTSUITE

Wanna be a social media ninja without having to stay online all day? This will manage all of your social media content and will allow you to pre‐schedule posts on all the major social networks. I usually schedule all of mine for a week prior. If something needs to be added last minute, I can jump in and post via the social network of choice. I use the free plan with this as well. To date, this has saved me from having to find a social media person and makes it appear as if I post regularly.

LIVECHAT

This is one the paid service I use. This is a stand‐alone app and works with just about every website type out there. It’s a sales tool and you can capture leads immediately. If you aren’t using this, you need to start. You can turn it on/off at any time. I’ve booked too many shows to count with this service.

These are my Top 5. What about you? Are you using something not on this list?

 

Based out of NYC, DJ Brian B is a successful internationally traveling private event DJ/MC. He runs a multicity mobile DJ/event business with offices in Orange County, Calif, Destin, FL and New York City. You can check him out at djbrianbofficial.com or bboyproductions.com

Promo Only DIY DJ Booth

Promo Only DIY DJ Booth , inspired by DJ TechTools and sponsored by Pioneer DJ.

The goal: To give Orlando DJs a place to experience the newest gear in a real-world setting free of the constraints of brick-and-mortar stores.

The Materials (suggested by DJ TechTools):

Kallax Shelves (4) http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/40278840/ $49.99 each

Linnmon Table Top (2) http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/20251356/ $45.99 each

Capita 6 ¾” Bracket (2) http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/40051196/ $19.99 (2-pack)

Capita Leg 6 ¼ Leg (2) http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/10267895/ $14.00 (4-pack)

Bjärnum Folding Hook (2) http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/60152590/ $9.99 (3-pack)

The Bling (suggested by Promo Only):

Stainless Steel Waterjet-Cut Front Plates w/translucent backing (2) – $75.00 each

Bladis Storage Baskets (8) http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/40223414/ $4.99 each

Char-Broil 26.5-in Steel Grill Rotisserie (4) http://www.lowes.com/  $29.99 each

Kreg 3-in Dual Locking Caster Set (2) http://www.lowes.com/ $80.66 (set of 4)

32’ LED Under-Cabinet Lighting w/color changer http://www.amazon.com/ $29.99 (set of 4)

 Total Cost – $880.00 and change

 Acknowledgements: We’d like to thank DJ TechTools for the inspiration, Promo Only co-owner & founder Pete Werner for the perspiration, and Pioneer DJ for their participation. No DJ lives were lost in the making of this video.

To Be Successful, You Need A System (A Cautionary Tale)

By: Mitch Taylor

Tell me if this sounds familiar.

Person “A” works in an industry for years, learning, implementing, developing excellence in product knowledge and outstanding customer service.  He thinks “Hey!  Why should the owner get all the money?  I should own my own business.”  So Owner A decides to open a new office, hangs his shingle and gets to work.  He does well for a while, working hard to take care of his customers, ensures that each customer is given attention to detail and eventually builds a decent client list.  He hires a person or two but not everyone seems to work out after they are given just a couple days of training and expected to sink or swim.

Person “B” works in an industry for years, learning, implementing, developing excellence in product knowledge and outstanding customer service. He then buys the business he was working in. He gets training in every aspect of his new business, hires staff, trains them properly vs. just throwing them on a computer, and enjoys the fruits of his labor with time off when it’s appropriate.

 Here’s the problem:  Owner A has spent too much time working IN his business vs. ON his business.  He has been focusing on minutiae rather than the big picture of where he wants his business to go 3 years, 5 years, 10 years down the road. He doesn’t reinvest in software that can help actively promote to his customer base.  He instead primarily focuses on sales and customer service (which is VERY important mind you) and fails to outsell his problems in other areas.

Meanwhile Owner B has put systems in place that will run efficiently, trained his staff appropriately and/or hired out experts to handle his business.  He has an active business plan, not just one that was drawn up years ago and filed in a drawer somewhere (if he even had one made at all).  He takes time to re-energize and rewards his staff for a job well done with incentives both personally and professionally.

Here’s the solution:  If you’ve read my new book, Sales 4 Event Pros [link: https://www.createspace.com/5646447 ] you’ve heard me state that there are six facets to any business: sales, marketing, planning, production, performance and operations, collectively referred to as a system. Systems are crucial and MUST be applied to every facet of your business — not just one or two.  Many people dislike the word “systems.”  They think that systems take the human element out of their connection with the client, or that numbers and systems can destroy the heart and soul of a business.  To the contrary, systems allow you to re-energize your heart and soul into your business.  Systems keep you sane.  They are VITAL to the life support of your business.  Without a system in place your business (and your wallet) will flat line.

Maybe you’re reading this right now and thinking “But Mitch, I suck at sales.” or “I’m no good at the operations side of things.”  HIRE people that you trust (interview at least twice and hire once) to handle those situations for you. 

Or know where to get help…

Do you need help at sales?  There’s workshops for that available at www.MitchTaylor.net/workshops or sign up for Jeffrey Gitomer’s Sales Caffeine ezine, or read any Gitomer book.

Need help at marketing?  Read Michael Port’s book Book Yourself Solid or Harry Beckwith’s Selling The Invisible or You, Inc.

Maybe planning is what you need.  Take a course in event planning through Association of Bridal Consultants or attend WeddingMBA.

If you’re looking for help in production and performance, watch improv. Study comedy.  Take Bill Hermann’s “The Entertainment Experience,” available at BillCreates.com.  Some of the best performance-based courses I’ve ever taken have comes from my mentors Mark and Rebecca Ferrell who can be found at MarkFerrell.com.  Randy Bartlett’s Advanced Mic Skills workshop and 1% Solution DVD has also been an integral part of my skill set.

Aah, operations — one of my favorites and quite possibly one of the most neglected aspects of our business.  Systems are extremely crucial here.  Lay out a calendar of when you need to accomplish things.  Set out your workweek in advance.  The best to learn from here is Matt Radicelli of Rock The House in Cleveland, OH.  Matt has recently started coaching entrepreneurs about their business and is well worth your investment.  Another resource for you is sba.gov.  Visit their website and browse areas where you need the most help and seek out trainings that can assist you.

It’s amazing to me how two different businesses, both in the same town, both in the same industry can have two COMPLETELY different outcomes.  Owner A is just going through life, without having a clear path or vision.  He more than likely won’t have anything to sell when he wants to retire because he IS his business.  Owner B can retire whenever he wants, gives back to the community when he can, and invests in his employees as well as new technology for his business.

Which one do you want to be and where do you want to go?  The key is in the work and counsel you seek.  Choose (research) wisely.

 

Mitch Taylor has worked in the Mobile Disc Jockey industry for over two decades, first cutting his teeth as an on-board club DJ for Carnival Cruise Lines. In addition to owning and operating Taylored Weddings in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, he is a sought-after speaker and Gitomer Certified Advisor whose sales training, books, coaching and workshops are in high demand all over the country.