Tag Archives: Music Subscription Service

The True Cost of Music Piracy

By Glen Ervin:

As convenient as the interwebz has made getting the music you need, the low-cost and invisibility of the ‘net has led to an explosion of too good to be true offers from websites masquerading as legitimate record pools. Think of them as the modern day version of that guy in the alley selling “real” Rolexes out of the trunk of his El Dorado… with access to your hard drive.

Fortunately there are a few of ways to tell which sites are operating in the shadows; the easiest is to keep an eye out for those selling legacy releases. The labels don’t allow it (why give away your best sellers?). Hence, any site offering unlimited access to a legacy catalog is not partnered with the labels or paying the artists or labels who provide their music.

Why should you care? 

The Institute of Policy Innovation estimates that global music piracy causes $12.5 billion of economic losses every year. That breaks down domestically to 71,060 music industry jobs lost since the days of Napster — a loss of $2.7 billion in workers’ earnings that accounts for $291 million in personal income tax and $131 million in lost corporate income and production taxes.

That’s $422 million dollars that could be going towards schools, roads, libraries and more – gone.

Let’s put that in terms every mobile operator can understand…

Economic losses on a scale that’s followed by nine zeros impacts everything from how much you charge for a wedding to how much time you get to spend with your family (instead of wearing all the hats required to run your business) to the car you drive — not a problem, by the way, for the $19.99 all you can download guys who keep all your money and drive Range Rovers.

Which brings us back to our friend in the alley and his deals on wheels…

If it seems to good to be true… it is.

Give your money to some hustler looking to turn downloads into dollars at the artist’s expense and you’ll just be feeding the dog-eat-dog world that keeps us all working for less than we deserve.

It’s up to you to decide what’s need and what’s greed.

After being turned out to pasture following a 16-year club residency, Glen Ervin finds himself gainfully employed as Promo Only sales manager, media consultant and staff writer.

Pioneer releases limited edition CDJ-2000NXS2-W and DJM-900NXS2-W

Pioneer is releasing exclusive new versions of their flagship multiplayer and DJ mixer in a brilliant white finish. A strictly limited run of 1,200 CDJ-2000NXS2-W decks (200 for the USA) will be produced, along with 600 DJM-900NXS2-W mixers (100 for the USA). Each unit will be stamped with a distinctive plaque featuring a unique serial number.

The CDJ-2000NXS2-W and the DJM-900NXS2-W will be available from October at an MAP of $2299 and $2299 respectively.

Find out more about the CDJ-2000NXS2-W and the DJM-900NXS2-W.

KEY FEATURES OF THE CDJ-2000NXS2-W

CDJ-2000NXS2-W_prm_angle_low_0825-848x658 

  • Next-generation high-resolution audio with support for FLAC/ALAC files
  • Full-colour touch screen with fast browsing and detailed track information including Wave Zoom, Needle Countdown, Phase Meter and more
  • Multiple performance features for almost endless creative possibilities
  • Pro DJ Link enables even more features
  • See full rekordboxTM track information including colour-coded Memory Cues 

KEY FEATURES OF THE DJM-900NXS2-W

DJM-900NXS2-W_prm_angle_low_0824-848x625

  • Highest quality audio components for a warm, detailed sound
  • Smooth curves on the EQs and channel faders for precise, seamless mixes
  • Detailed control of a wealth of FX plus an independent send/return
  • Two USB ports, four phono inputs and DVS support for total flexibility and seamless DJ handovers
  • Pro DJ Link via LAN or USB for even more scope and flexibility

CDJ-2000NXS2-W SPECIFICATIONS

CDJ-2000NXS2-W_prm_top_low_0825-848x1071

Playable media iPhone/iPad/iPod touch, Android phone, etc.

USB storage devices (flash memory/HDD, etc.)

Computers (Mac/Windows PC), Audio CD, CD-R/RW,

DVD±R/RW/R-DL, SD card

Playable files WAV, AIFF, FLAC, Apple Lossless

(Sampling rate: 44.1/48/88.2/96 kHz, Bit depth: 16/24-bit)

 

MP3

(Sampling rate: 32/44.1/48 kHz, Bit depth: 16-bit)

 

AAC

(Sampling rate: 16/22.05/24/32/44.1/48 kHz, Bit depth: 16-bit)
* rekordbox for iPhone: MP3 and AAC only

USB storage support file systems FAT, FAT32, HFS+
Frequency response 4 Hz to 40 kHz
S/N ratio 115 dB (JEITA)
Total harmonic distortion 0.0018% (JEITA)
USB ports USB A port x 1, USB B port x 1
Audio output ports Audio Out (RCA) x 1, Digital Out(Coaxial) x 1
Other ports LAN (100Base-TX) x 1
Audio output voltage 2.0 Vrms
Power requirements AC 110-240 V, 50/60 Hz
Max external dimensions

(W x D x H)

320.0 mm x 414.4 mm x 113.2 mm
Weight 5.7 kg

rekordbox dj SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

Compatible OS

(Windows)

Windows 10, 8.1, 7 (the latest service pack)

Intel® processor Core™ i7, i5, i3

Intel® processor Core™ 2 Duo 2.0 GHz or above

4GB or more of RAM

Compatible OS

(Mac)

macOS Sierra 10.12 (updated to the latest version),

Intel® processor Core™ i7, i5, i3

Intel® processor Core™ 2 Duo 2.0 GHz or above

4GB or more of RAM

Hard Drive 250MB or more of free space (not including space for storing music files, etc.)
Sound Audio output to speakers, headphones, etc. (internal or external audio device)
USB port A USB 2.0 port is used to connect a controller or a mixer, and export track files to a USB storage device such as a flash drive and a hard disk drive
Playable music file FLAC, ALAC, WAV, AIFF, MP3, AAC
Internet connection An internet connection is needed to create a rekordbox user account and to download and activate the software
Display resolution 1280 × 768 or greater

 DJM-900NXS2-W SPECIFICATIONS

         DJM-900NXS2-W_prm_top_low_0824-848x1024

Number of channels 4 x audio channels, 2 x Mic channels
Input ports Digital In x 4 (Coaxial), Line x 4 (RCA), Phono x 4 (RCA), Mic x 2 (XLR & 1/4-inch TRS Jack x 1, 1/4-inch TRS Jack x 1)
Output ports Master Out x 2 (XLR x 1, RCA x 1), Booth Out x 1 (1/4-inch TRS Jack), Headphone Monitor Out x 2 (1/4-inch Stereo Phone Jack, 3.5 mm Stereo Mini Jack), REC Out x 1 (RCA), Digital Out x 1(Coaxial)
Other ports Send x 1 (1/4-inch TS Jack), Return x 1(1/4-inch TS Jack), USB (Type B) x 2, USB (Type A) x 1, Link x 1 (LAN 100Base-TX)
Sampling rate 96 kHz
D/A converter 32-bit
A/D converter 24-bit
Frequency response 20 Hz to 40 kHz (LINE)
Total Harmonic Distortion ratio 0.005% or less (LINE-MASTER1)
S/N ratio 105 dB (LINE)
Max external dimensions

(W x D x H)

333.0 mm x 414.2 mm x 107.9 mm
Unit weight 8.0 kg

Disclaimer:

* rekordboxTM is a registered trademark of Pioneer DJ Corporation.

* Mac, Mac OS and OS X are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the US and other countries.

* Windows® is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the US and other countries.

* Intel® and Intel Core™ are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation in the US and other countries.

* The names of companies, product names, and technology names mentioned herein are the trademarks of their respective owners.

 

Website: http://www.pioneerdj.com/

Pioneer Pro Audio introduces the XY-3B and XY-2

Two powerful new speakers are joining Pioneer Pro Audio’s XY Series: the XY-3B three-way full range speaker and the XY-2 mid-high speaker.

XY-3WAY_XY-218HS_stack_angle_low_0908

Both are designed to deliver natural audio at the high sound pressure level (SPL) required for large venues and outdoor events.

The XY Series is well-known for providing excellent sound quality to nightclubs and music venues around the world. With the introduction of the XY-3B and XY-2, which offers the highest output in the Series, even more venues and events can benefit from an XY Series sound system tailored to their specific needs.

The next-level XY-3B was developed over the course of three years using 3D printers to create natural sound with high output. It’s been tested at numerous international festivals and outdoor events such as Xtrema Outdoor; Belgium and Netherlands; Lovebox, London; and Tomorrowland, Belgium. The XY-3B received enthusiastic feedback every time.

In the new XY-3B, an 8-inch cone driver delivers clean and precise mid-range frequencies using Pioneer Pro Audio’s X-Phase system. A 1-inch compression driver produces crystal-clear HF which, thanks to the molded Bi-horn, seamlessly blends with the mids. Two 12-inch cone drivers create tight, chest-pumping low end.

The XY-2 speaker is the mid-high section of the XY-3B. Designed specifically for large-scale venues and stadia, the XY-2 can be used for PA applications, as a DJ booth monitor or as a down fill in an XY-3B cluster setting.

The new XY Series speakers will be available from early 2018 at MAPs of $5,500 for the XY-3B and $3,000 for the XY-2.

Watch the introduction video or find out more about the XY-3B and XY-2.

KEY FEATURES OF THE XY-3B

 XY-3WAY-K_prm_angle_no-grill_low_0901-848x1438

  1. Moulded Bi-horn

The 8-inch mid-range driver and the 1-inch compression driver are attached to the integrated waveguide with their depths perfectly aligned to minimize the difference of physical distance and reduce cancellation around the crossover frequency. This unique Bi-horn combines mid and high frequencies in a deep position inside the waveguide, improving the blend of the sounds compared to the performance of a conventional separated horn structure. The waveguide’s curved shape perfectly controls dispersion at 50 degrees horizontal and 35 degrees vertical, providing natural sound with high SPL in the targeted area while reducing the sound pressure outside that area.

  1. X-Phase system with gold X-Phase plug

Driver cone cancellation is minimized thanks to Pioneer Pro Audio’s X-Phase system. The convex shape forces sound waves into small slits which are arranged in a fan shape, allowing all sound waves to exit in perfect phase aliment. The sound waves are forced over the top and bottom of the X-phase plug, producing higher SPL and greater sound projection over long distances.

  1. Hybrid low-mid section

A hybrid dual 12-inch chamber in the low-mid section allows the drivers to produce tight notes. The LF drivers are also coated with a water-resistant finish on both sides, so you can use the XY-3 speakers outdoors. Plus, the added stiffness of this treatment allows the drivers to deliver a natural tightness rather than using thicker speaker cone material which would add weight and slow down the speed of the cones.

  1. Rigging and tour ready
  • Rigging: Flying hardware options are available, along with ground stacking configurations.
  • Tour ready: Every detail of the XY-3 was designed to make it the perfect speaker to take on the road. You can load the speakers into trucks with the minimal amount of space lost, and they can be stacked two-high and four-wide when used with the XY-3 wheel board.

KEY FEATURES OF THE XY-2

XY-2_prm_angle_low_0901-848x1016

The XY-2 is a mid-high speaker taken from the mid-high range horn section of the XY-3B. A yoke is installed as standard and it can be used for various applications including as a PA speaker for large stadiums, a DJ booth monitor, or as a down fill for an XY-3B cluster setting.

Main Specifications

XY-3_3D-STILLS_Shot2-848x477

Type 3WAY Bi-amp loudspeaker
Model (Color) XY-3B (Black), XY-3B-W (White)
Enclosure 15 mm birch plywood
Drivers LF 12 inch neodymium cone driver x 2
MF 8 inch neodymium cone driver
HF 1 inch exit neodymium compression driver
Frequency Response 55 Hz~17 kHz
Sensitivity LF 102 dB
MF 107 dB
Power handling LF 1200 W(RMS), 2400 W(Program)
MHF 200 W (RMS), 400 W(Program)
Max SPL LF 133 dB(cont.), 139 dB(peak)
MHF 130 dB(cont.), 136 dB(peak)
Terminals speak ON® NL4 x 2
Impedance LF
MHF 8Ω
Dimension (W x H x D) 530 mm x 1080 mm x 540 mm
Weight 57.6 kg

 

Type 2WAY Mid-High loudspeaker
Enclosure Polyurethane
Drivers MF 8 inch neodymium cone
HF 1 inch exit neodymium compression driver
Frequency Response 170 Hz~17 kHz
Sensitivity 107 dB
Power handling 200 W(RMS), 400 W(Program)
Max SPL 130 dB(cont.), 136 dB(peak)
Terminals speak ON® NL4 x 2
Impedance 8 Ω
Dimension (W x H x D) 480 mm x 480 mm x 376 mm
Weight 12.5kg

Disclaimer:

* speakON® is a registered trademark of Neutrik® Limited.

* Other stated company names, product names, technology names, etc. are the trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Website: http://www.pioneerdj.com/

Playlists. The Demise of DJing?

By Tony Fernandez

Google “playlists” and you’ll likely get the following results: Best 25 Playlist Ideas on Pinterest, Playlists from Spotify, Playlists from Soundcloud, Playlists from Tidal, The Ultimate Wedding playlist… none of which bode too well for the DJ industry, at least as we know it.

And there is no stopping the trend.

In a relatively short span of time, playlists have grown from innocuous lists of songs individuals put together to run, work out, enjoy in the car, etc. to defacto musical blueprints for weddings, parties, and life experiences.

 I don’t want to come of like some old geezer that doesn’t embrace technology. I’m a geek with a very well populated hard drive and the skill to know how to use it. So I get that playlists serve a purpose: it’s how most people organize, cultivate and share their music.

But playlists are also dumbing down the most important aspect of DJing — music. And it’s happening on two fronts.

First, given the ubiquity of playlists, regular people (i.e. people with the potential to sign your paycheck) are under the delusion that if they can pick tunes for their life events, why hire you to do it. Of course, as professionals, we know it’s not so easy to string along a set of songs together and whip up a party.

Making a list of songs is easy. Making a list of songs work for a group of people in a harmonious, fluid, timely, and celebratory manner is hard.

Secondly, as the digital age of music has immersed our society in streaming the music we consume, DJs (to me) have lost the drive and desire to explore music and seem to rely on playlists to do their thinking. It’s akin to having a tiger in captivity and a tiger in the wild. If a captive tiger is being fed, that tiger isn’t going to be as sharp as the wild tiger that seeks out and hunts its food.

Don’t get me wrong, we’ve all asked for help with music. There is absolutely nothing wrong with seeking advice, assistance, and insight from your peers. It just seems to me that there are far too many DJs taking the easy road and expecting playlists to properly execute a well-played set. I know that playlists are not going away. I’m not daft enough to even suggest DJs shouldn’t use playlists. They are a great resource when used to supplement your arsenal. But come on kids, don’t be lazy, don’t be complacent. Learn your music, learn your craft.

The benefits and rewards you’ll reap will serve you for your entire career.

P.S. I’ve recently discovered something even scarier about playlists. Companies like Spotify will soon be using the playlists being generated and shared by their subscribers to target market to those very same subscribers.   But don’t worry about that, Google, Apple, and Skynet have bigger and better plans… J

Based out of Richmond, VA, DJ Tony Fernandez has been a DJ, Remixer, Producer, Musical Soothsayer and Audio Gear Oracle since 1980. Find him on facebook. Email djtonytf@gmail.com

DJs and Streaming

By Tony Fernandez:

Alright kids, it seems to me that it’s been a little while since I’ve been on my soap box or have had a rant, so strap in, we’re all due. Let me begin with a small disclaimer… I’m not looking to kick a hornet’s nest or start a moral, much less a legal tirade. I’m coming from an angle of trying to understand the rational of streaming… and hopefully illicit some chuckles in the process.

Let’s begin….

The Internet is a splendid thing. There is no doubt about that. Wi-Fi and being untethered has opened up countless possibilities and opportunities. Advancements are made monthly at such a pace that what was just simply amazing last month, heck, last week is commonplace today.
Maybe I am a bit too old school. I came from a place where DJs actually have their music. I mean that quite literally. You physically have the music you’re going to play. In the current state we are in, I do understand “having” music means that you have music on a hard drive. But the point still remains: you have access to that file on demand. Because it lives on your hard drive.

So why is streaming a “thing”? I don’t get it. Like most people on the planet, a good chunk of my life is wrapped up in my cell phone. Having said that, I find myself not having the best signal everywhere I go. And I still experience the randomness of dropped calls. I get that cell phones signals are different than Wi-Fi signals, but I still surmise that if I can’t get a SOLID cell phone connection, why should I assume that my Wi-Fi signal is stable? And don’t tell me about hot spots. Again, no cell signal and your hot spot is a paperweight.

I also get that a good number of venues do offer Wi-Fi connection to vendors. Are you really ready to rely on a network that you’re not 100% certain is robust enough to handle the load? Is the network also open to the public? If that is the case, how does it work when you have 15, 25, 45 people on public Wi-Fi and you’re trying to download, much less, stream content and use said content in real time? I would assume not too well.

And this is where I begin to scratch my head….

With as much technology, CPU processor horsepower, RAM, etc., that hardware can harness, you’re placing your success on an unknown variable that offers you ZERO control. Think about it: You are trying to download, stream and play a decent size music file in REAL TIME.

We ask a lot of our computers and software. Granted, they are marketed as being able to handle pretty much anything thrown at it. But we know that’s just not true. When you turn on your computer and it’s just sitting there, it’s really running 20, 30, maybe even 40 other programs in the background. Some you can’t turn off. Then you launch your DJ software. So now you want the computer to run the OS and the DJ software, plus you want the system to manipulate chunks of data and convert those chunks of data from 1’s & 0’s to analog audio. All the while providing you a GUI and audio feed to monitor all of the manipulation in REAL TIME.

Now you want to open up a network connection, get on the internet, log into a service, search a data base, download/stream the content you found and integrate that content seamlessly in real time to the gig you’re DJaying.

Right…

I know I’m not going to stop progress and I’m not trying to. Nor am I trying to be a harbinger of technology potentially gone awry. Each DJ will find their own level of technological prowess and embrace it. Speaking for myself, I know I’m NOT going to tax my computer any more than I have to. Nor am I going to set myself up for relying on a cell/ Wi-Fi signal that may not be there when I REALLY need it.

Till next time DJs. I’m still waiting for the Wi-Fi here to come back on line so I can pay for my pizza and go home. Gotta love technology.

Based out of Richmond, VA, DJ Tony Fernandez has been a DJ, Remixer, Producer, Musical Soothsayer and Audio Gear Oracle since 1980. Find him on facebook. Email djtonytf@gmail.com

Communication is Key: Creating Connections w/ Mitch TayloR

By Mitch Taylor:

I don’t know about you but at the age of 42 I find it increasingly difficult to communicate with today’s millennial brides, the majority of who tend to prefer to communicate via email. My assistant (a 24-year-old millennial herself) and I had occasion to discuss this the other day after a bridal show and were amazed that some businesses still use very formal language to communicate with young brides — only to be left wondering why they get no response.

Speak to a prospective bride just as she is speaking to you.  If she’s using short sentences with basic language, do the same. If she mentions descriptive words about her event use those same words in your reply.

Here’s an example of an email recently received and how we handled it to get the appointment:

Hello I am just getting ideas and prices at the moment and I was wondering around what your average pricing would be I would also like the uplighting also an email would prob be the best way to respond thanks for your time.

Amber

My response:

Hi!  How’s your wedding planning going?  I got your email regarding entertainment and uplighting for your wedding.  I attached a photo above to show you examples of our work and how we can transform your venue too.  Feel free to call me anytime and let’s talk about your day.  906.786.6967.  Thanks for contacting me and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

 Mitch

Bride’s Reply:

I am sorry I have gotten your calls but been busy working.  At this time we are going to go with a live band from 8-12.  I am looking to rent uplighting (for the whole night of the reception) and also entertainment from 4:00pm-8pm.  Not many have been willing to do that time slot since it is Labor Day weekend.  Please let me know

My response:

Hi Amber,

Sure…we can do that.  When’s a good time for us to get together to chat about your wedding?

Bride’s Reply:

I work in Marquette at Lowe’s.  My next days off are Monday and Tuesday.  I have a cake appointment in Marquette on Monday at 12pm.  Where are you located and what is a good time for you?

My reply:

Hi Amber,

What about Monday at 1:30pm?  Would that work?

Bride’s Reply:

Yes I think that would work.  What is the best phone number to get a hold of you in case I need too?  I have a cake appointment a 12:00 so I will be in town.

 My next response was to send her an email confirming that date and time with an appointment reminder from DJ Event Planner.

Bottom line: Brides want to do business with someone who understands what they want, gives them the information they need in a timely fashion connects with them.

Be real. Be honest. But most importantly be relatable. Speak to them the same way through email as you would over the phone.

About: Mitch Taylor owns and operates Taylored Weddings and can be reached via email at mitch@mitchtaylor.net. For more info about his Creating Connections books and workshops visit creatingconnections.biz

 

Music and DJs – Finding the Sweet Stuff

By Tony Fernandez

 

When I began DJing, I used cassette tapes. Don’t ask me how I did it, but I did. A lot of the tracks were bootlegged off the radio in NYC and then I’d bring these gems to VA, where I was in school (I was 14 at the time; I know better now). I quickly moved up to vinyl, eventually stepped up to CDs around ’89 and have been hustling for new tunes ever since.

Back then, I had established a network of people that knew me and knew what I liked. There were record stores. I knew the people in those stores and they knew me. There was mail order. I used to call 12” Dance in Washington DC, or Dancetraxx/Vinylmania in NYC more often than I’d like to admit. And there were record pools. Pools would have advanced copies and promo-only mixes that weren’t accessible to the public. Naturally I wanted those the most.

Having that new release or remix and dropping that track in your set is an awesome feeling.

It’s even a little sweeter, if you have that mix that no one else has.

I was fortunate to become a Billboard Reporting DJ for a time, which led to even more music that was not readily available to the public. Then the Internet happened. Napster happened. Limewire happened. WinMX happened. Audio Galaxy happened. The Internet became the great equalizer. Through legit (and sometimes not so legit) means, anyone could get almost any song created by any one.

And everything changed.

Music can now be streamed or downloaded at your desire: remixes, unreleased mixes, bootlegs, white labels, promo only releases, etc. — literally millions of songs and remixes await the click of a mouse. With a little effort you can find foreign edits and mixes done by DJs in the UK, France, South Africa, Germany, and more. That crazy version you heard at your club, concert, festival, radio, car, store, gas station, TV commercial, streaming service? Your chances of finding that version now are pretty high.

So if we ALL have the access, by and large, to the music being cranked out for public consumption, how do you find that unique banger that’s going to make you stand out? Trust me, it’s out there. There is new music to be found and new music to be had…

You just have to be proactive and find it.

 

  • If you just wait for your monthly subscription to feed you tunes, you’re not being proactive.
  • If you just echo what’s on radio, you’re not being proactive.
  • If you’re bemoaning the “fact” that there’s no “good” music, you’re not bring proactive.

 

Some would say (me included) that it’s part of your job as a DJ to seek, find, and play new tunes.

They’re right.

Be proactive in your approach. Be the proactive DJ you can be. Find those new tunes. Your crowds, your floors and your clients will thank you.

 

Based out of Richmond, VA, DJ Tony Fernandez has been a DJ, Remixer, Producer, Musical Soothsayer and Audio Gear Oracle since 1980. Find him on facebook. Email djtonytf@gmail.com

Music and DJs – Finding the Sweet Stuff

By Tony Fernandez:

When I began DJing, I used cassette tapes. Don’t ask me how I did it, but I did. A lot of the tracks were bootlegged off the radio in NYC and then I’d bring these gems to VA, where I was in school (I was 14 at the time; I know better now). I quickly moved up to vinyl, eventually stepped up to CDs around ’89 and have been hustling for new tunes ever since.

Back then, I had established a network of people that knew me and knew what I liked. There were record stores. I knew the people in those stores and they knew me. There was mail order. I used to call 12” Dance in Washington DC, or Dancetraxx/Vinylmania in NYC more often than I’d like to admit. And there were record pools. Pools would have advanced copies and promo-only mixes that weren’t accessible to the public. Naturally I wanted those the most.

Having that new release or remix and dropping that track in your set is an awesome feeling.

It’s even a little sweeter, if you have that mix that no one else has.

I was fortunate to become a Billboard Reporting DJ for a time, which led to even more music that was not readily available to the public. Then the Internet happened. Napster happened. Limewire happened. WinMX happened. Audio Galaxy happened. The Internet became the great equalizer. Through legit (and sometimes not so legit) means, anyone could get almost any song created by any one.

And everything changed.

Music can now be streamed or downloaded at your desire: remixes, unreleased mixes, bootlegs, white labels, promo only releases, etc. — literally millions of songs and remixes await the click of a mouse. With a little effort you can find foreign edits and mixes done by DJs in the UK, France, South Africa, Germany, and more. That crazy version you heard at your club, concert, festival, radio, car, store, gas station, TV commercial, streaming service? Your chances of finding that version now are pretty high.

So if we ALL have the access, by and large, to the music being cranked out for public consumption, how do you find that unique banger that’s going to make you stand out? Trust me, it’s out there. There is new music to be found and new music to be had…

You just have to be proactive and find it.

  • If you just wait for your monthly subscription to feed you tunes, you’re not being proactive.
  • If you just echo what’s on radio, you’re not being proactive.
  • If you’re bemoaning the “fact” that there’s no “good” music, you’re not bring proactive.

Some would say (me included) that it’s part of your job as a DJ to seek, find, and play new tunes.

They’re right.

Be proactive in your approach. Be the proactive DJ you can be. Find those new tunes. Your crowds, your floors and your clients will thank you.

Based out of Richmond, VA, DJ Tony Fernandez has been a DJ, Remixer, Producer, Musical Soothsayer and Audio Gear Oracle since 1980. Find him on facebook. Email djtonytf@gmail.com

Pioneer Pro DJ Announces the New DDJ-SZ2

Pioneer DJ has upgraded their flagship Serato DJ controller to create the DDJ-SZ2. Use the new DDJ-SZ2 4-channel controller to get hands-on with the latest additions to Serato DJ, including key shift, key sync, pitch play and Serato Flip. The multi-colored Performance Pads give you instant feedback on pad modes and playing statuses, and thanks to the improved jog wheel latency, scratching is more responsive and precise than ever.

To help you get the most out of the controller, the DDJ-SZ2 comes bundled with the latest version of Serato DJ. The Pitch ‘n Time DJ and Serato Flip expansion packs are also included so you can use several new features including pitch play and key sync.

The DDJ-SZ2 will be available in the U.S.A. and Canada in January 2017, with a retail price of $1,999.00.

Watch the DDJ-SZ2 introduction video.

Learn more about the DDJ-SZ2 controller for Serato DJ.

FREE SERATO VIDEO EXPANSION PACK PROMOTION

Pioneer is putting a voucher for a free Serato Video expansion pack in the boxes of the first 3,000 DDJ-SZ2 controllers that they ship worldwide. This comes along with the Serato DJ, Pitch ‘n Time DJ and Serato Flip expansion packs bundled with the controller as standard, so if you’re one of the first DJs to buy the DDJ-SZ2, you’ll have full control of audio and video performances.

KEY FEATURES OF THE DDJ-SZ2

 

  1. Layout mirrors CDJ-style set-up

Mix and scratch instinctively on the controller, which looks and feels similar to a full professional CDJ + DJM set-up.

  • Big Jogs: Scratching feels natural on the big jog wheels taken from the CDJ-2000NXS2, and the illuminating On-Jog Display gives you information about the current playback status and position for more precise performances. Jog Feeling Adjust, also from the CDJ series, lets you customize the resistance and backspin time.
  • Multi-colored Performance Pads: Use the large, multi-colored tactile Performance Pads to trigger Hot Cues, samples and FX. Hit the pads harder to increase the volume of samples and watch their colors change as they indicate the selected pad mode and playing status.
  • DJM-style mixer section: Stay in control at all times thanks to the simple layout of the mixer section which mirrors the design of the DJM series.

 

  1. Dual USB port for smooth DJ changeovers

Dual USB ports lets you hookup two computers at the same time and use the top-loaded A/B switch for seamless DJ transitions.

 

  1. Native support and dedicated controls for new Serato DJ features
  • Key shift, key sync and pitch play: Use dedicated controls to trigger the new key shift and key sync functions in Serato DJ, which let you adjust the key of tracks and sync the keys of tracks during mixes. Pitch play lets you play your Hot Cues across a range of different keys and assign them to the controller’s Performance Pads.
  • Serato Flip: Create and save Hot Cue sequences to make custom edits of your tracks and use the dedicated Serato Flip controls to play them back at the touch of a button. Get even more creative by skipping or repeating track sections on the fly.

 

  1. Professional performance features and FX
  • Sound Color FX: Spice up your sets with the four popular Sound Color FX from our DJM series; Echo, Jet, Pitch and Filter. You can sync Echo with the BPM of the track that’s playing.
  • Oscillator: Add texture and tension to your tracks with the four oscillator sounds; Noise, Drop, Laser and Siren. Turn the oscillator parameter knob to create new tones.

 

  1. Magvel crossfader

The Magvel crossfader – taken from the club standard DJM-900NXS2 – is the ultimate to mix and scratch with. Accurate and smooth, it’s durable for more than 10 million movements and is liquid and dust resistant.

 

  1. High-quality sound

Hear your tracks loud and clear thanks to the audio circuit inherited from professional Pioneer DJ gear. Contact resistance is reduced by the AC inlet, and the high-performance D/A converter made by Cirrus Logic, Inc., and low jitter oscillator mean the DDJ-SZ2 reproduces clear and powerful sound that’s faithful to its source.

 

  1. Other features
  • Plug and play: Simply connect your laptop and start mixing via Serato DJ. All buttons and controls, as well as the built-in sound card, are Serato DJ-ready.
  • Aluminium-finished top panel and jog wheels: For a quality look and feel.
  • Slip Mode: Silently keeps a track playing during a loop, scratch or Hot Cue. Release the jog wheel and the track comes back at exactly the right place.
  • Needle search pad: Instantly jump to a specific part of a track with a simple touch of the pad.
  • Peak limiter: Controls clipping of the master output.
  • P-Lock Fader Cap: Locks all fader knobs to prevent dropping

 

 DDJ-SZ2 SPECIFICATIONS

 

  DDJ-SZ2
Software Serato DJ
Input ports CD/Line x 4 (RCA)
Phono x 2 (RCA)

MIC x 2

(XLR & ¼-inch TRS Jack x 1, ¼-inch TRS Jack x 1)

Output ports Master Out x 2
(RCA x 1, XLR x 1),
Booth Out x 1 (¼-inch Stereo Phone Jack)

Headphone Monitor Out x 2
(Front ¼-inch TRS Jack,

3.5 mm Stereo Mini Jack)

Other ports USB (Type B) x 2
Sampling Rate 44.1 kHz
D/A Converter 24-bit
A/D Converter 24-bit
Frequency response 20Hz ~ 20kHz (LINE)
Total Harmonic Distortion ratio 0.002% or less (USB)

0.004% or less (LINE)

S/N ratio 111 dB or above (USB)
Headroom 19 dB
Maximum dimensions

(W×H×D)

870 x 98.4 x 419.5 mm (34.3 x 3.9 x 16.5 in)
Unit weight 10.7 kg (23.6 lbs)

 SERATO DJ SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

Compatible OS
(Windows®)
Windows® 10, 8.1, 7 (The latest service pack)
Compatible OS
(Mac)
macOS Sierra 10.12, OS X 10.11, 10.10, 10.9 (Updated to the latest version)
CPU (32/64 bit) Intel® processer CoreTM i7, i5 or above
Memory 4GB or more of RAM

Serato Video requires a graphics card with 384MB of dedicated video memory

Display resolution Resolution of 1280 x 720 or greater

* Serato DJ is a registered trademark of Serato Audio Research Ltd.

* Windows is a registered trademark or a trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

* Mac and Mac OS are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

* Intel and Intel Core are trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and/or other countries.

* The names of companies, product names, and technology names mentioned herein are the trademarks of their respective owners.

 About Pioneer DJ

Pioneer DJ Americas, Inc. is the subsidiary of Pioneer DJ Corporation responsible for sales and marketing in North, Central, and South America. For more than 20 years, Pioneer DJ has been a market leader in the design and production of innovative DJ equipment and software. The company works closely with DJs and clubs to deliver next generation products that inspire and shape the global dance music community. Its portfolio includes brands such as Pioneer Professional Audio and Pioneer DJ Radio, rekordbox dj software, as well as social platforms KUVO and DJsounds. Pioneer DJ Corporation is a privately held company headquartered in Yokohama, Japan.

Is Facebook Live the end of the DJ Mix Tape? Part 1

By Tony Fernandez

Mix tapes and DJs go together like peanut butter and jelly. The mix tape is a DJ’s calling card. A DJ’s sonic resume. Personally, I come from a point in time when you actually used tape to do a mix tape. But we’ve all made mix CDs… for our girlfriends, boyfriends, travel tunes, business cards, promotional showcases — the uses are endless.

Fast forward to our current state of affairs: SoundCloud, Mixcloud, Facebook, Facebook Live are all great vehicles that allow DJs to share their talent with the world. However, there is conflict in the air. The waters are churning. There is strife between the DJ world and the digital world. The same vehicle(s) that have allowed DJs to share their vision and skills with the world are now clamping down on the sharing and showcasing of those skills.

I am not a lawyer, nor do I play one on TV, but I did have the following facts checked by a lawyer (who is also a DJ, producer, and copyright holder), so as to simply and correctly explain why mix tapes and the streaming of those mixes are being removed.

Let’s dig in….

DJs need to realize that the music they mix, play, use, and purchase is not “your” music. It’s natural to draw the conclusion that because you have purchased a song you’re allowed to play it publicly in a DJ set. Well, according to U.S. copyright law, this is incorrect.

There are several types of rights copyright owners must obtain under the law to distribute musical works, all of which are exclusive, including:

  • Public Performance (transmitting or performing the work in public)
  • Reproduction (copying/duplicating)
  • Digital Performance (internet streaming)

With that information in hand, we can move forward and explain why DJs aren’t allowed to post, stream, or share their mixes.

When a DJ spins at a nightclub, it’s incumbent on the venue to make sure they have a license for public performance. This license is acquired from the PROs (performance rights organizations). When the venue has a public performance license, it means that DJs can play recorded music registered with the PRO.

Radio stations pretty much work the same way. The difference is the radio stations license is for broadcast. Their license authorizes the radio station to play music on public airwaves.

Streaming services do not have a clear relationship with PROs. When a DJ creates a live stream and starts broadcasting music on the internet, that DJ becomes, in effect, a radio station. As such, he or she needs to have the appropriate licenses.

No licenses, no stream.

This is, unfortunately, where we find ourselves today – at the crossroads of artistic expression and the rights of copyright holders.

It’s apparent that copyright laws are falling behind: DJ sets are not a protected form of free speech. Our sets don’t generally fall under “fair use”.

As such, copyright takedowns happen.

What can you do about it?

Stay tuned for Part 2…

Based out of Richmond, VA, DJ Tony Fernandez has been a DJ, Remixer, Producer, Musical Soothsayer and Audio Gear Oracle since 1980. Find him on facebook. Email djtonytf@gmail.com